Here are some suggestions from the staff.  Today we are including a few authors who write fiction and nonfiction:  Wendell Berry, Ivan Doig, May Sarton, Wallace Stegner, and Monica Wood.  Click on titles to check availability.

Fiction

Britt-Marie was Here by Fredrik Backman (2016)

Walking away from her loveless marriage and taking a job in a derelict, financially devastated town, sixty-three-year-old Britt-Marie uses her fierce organizational skills to become a local soccer coach to a group of lost children.

Nathan Coulter by Wendell Berry (1985)

Part of the author’s series of novels set in Port Williams, Kentucky. This novel tells the story of one year in the life of young Nathan Coulter, who is growing up on a farm in the fictional community of Port William.

Last Bus to Wisdom by Ivan Doig (2015)

When Donal Cameron’s grandmother needs surgery he is sent to live with his Aunt Kate and her husband in Wisconsin. After one too many falling outs, Kate sends Donal back to Montana, but he is not going back alone.

The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter by Theresa Goss (2017)

Book #1 of the Extraordinary Adventures of Athena Club. Alone and penniless, Mary Jekyll hunts for her father’s killer, a former friend named Edward Hyde, along with help from Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson resulting in the discovery of a secret society of immoral and power-crazed scientists.

Frederica by Georgette Heyer (1965)

Heyer was known for her Regency-era Romances.  In this, the Marquis of Alverstoke finds himself drawn to Frederica, the distant cousin who has asked for his help in launching the social debut of her younger sister, Charis, and caring for her schoolboy brothers.

The Unfinished Clue by Georgette Heyer (1937)

Heyer also wrote mysteries, like this one. When Sir Arthur Billington-Smith, an abusive wretch hated by everyone from his disinherited son to his wife’s stoic would-be lover, is found stabbed to death, no one is particularly grieved and no one has an alibi. The unhappy guests find themselves under the scrutiny of Scotland Yard’s cool-headed Inspector Harding, who has solved tough cases before but this time, the talented inspector discovers much more than he has bargained for.

Euphoria by Lily King (2014)

Frustrated by his research efforts and depressed over the death of his brothers, Andre Banson runs into two fellow anthropologists, a married couple, in 1930s New Guinea and begins a tumultuous relationship with them.

44 Scotland Street by Alexander McCall Smith (2005)

First in the series, Pat rents a room from the handsome and cocky Bruce, at 44 Scotland Street, and discovers that she has also acquired some colorful new neighbors, including Domenica, an eccentric widow.

The Fur Person by May Sarton (1978)

A stray cat recounts his evolution to a Gentleman Cat and finally to a real Fur Person–a cat who has decided to stay with people as long as he lives.

Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner (1987)

Two young couples, Sid and Charity and Larry and Sally, from different backgrounds–East and West, rich and poor–befriend each other in 1937 Madison, Wisconsin.

Delta Wedding by Eudora Welty (1946)

Set in 1923, on the Mississippi Delta, this story captures the mind and manners of a large aristocratic family.

Crosstalk by Connie Willis (2016)

In a not-too-distant future, a simple outpatient procedure that has been promised to increase empathy between romantic partners has become all the rage. Only…the results aren’t quite as expected.

The One-in-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood (2016)

When Quinn’s young son suddenly dies, he seeks forgiveness for his shortcomings by completing one of his son’s Boy Scout badges, where he forges a friendship with Ona, a 104-year-old woman.

Nonfiction

The Bird Way: A New Look at How Birds Talk, Work, Play, Parent and Think by Jennifer Ackerman  (2020)

A new book on bird behavior upends some traditional views on how birds conduct their lives.

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: the True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession  by Allison Hoover Bartlett (2009)

In telling the true story of book thief John Charles Gilkey and the man who was driven to capture him, journalist Allison Hoover Bartlett explores the larger history of book passion, collection, and theft through the ages.

The Art of Loading Brush: New Agrarian Essays by Wendell Berry (2002)

Wendell Berry’s critique of American culture has entered its sixth decade, and in this new gathering he reaches with deep devotion toward a long view of Agrarian philosophy. Mr. Berry believes that American cultural problems are nearly always aligned with their agricultural problems, and recent events have shone a terrible spotlight on the divides between our urban and rural citizens. Our communities are as endangered as our landscapes. There is, as Berry outlines, still much work to do, and our daily lives–in hope and affection — must triumph over despair.

Leavings: Poems by Wendell Berry (2010)

Poetry collection.

This House of Sky: Landscapes of a Western Mind by Ivan Doig (1978)

Ivan Doig recalls growing up among the ranches and wilderness of Montana with his father and grandmother, and their friends in the rural community.

My Life in the Maine Woods: A Game Warden’s Wife in Allagash Country by Annette Jackson (1954)

Autobiography of an Allagash game warden’s wife depicting how she and her family lived in the wilderness.

The House by the Sea: A Journal by May Sarton (1977)

Sarton lived in York, Maine from 1973 until her death in 1995. She describes her internal and external adjustments to life on the Maine coast, where a deepening sense of solitude and oneness with the sea brought her to new heights of creative passion.

Letters from Maine: New Poems by May Sarton (1984)

Poetry by May Sarton.

Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs:  Living and Writing in the West by Wallace Stegner (1992)

A collection of anecdotal essays makes up the memoirs of an honored writer, conservationist, and teacher as he describes the culture of the West, as well as the region’s landscape, literature, and character.

When We Were the Kennedys: A Memoir from Mexico, Maine by Monica Wood (2012)

Monica Wood writes how her family coped with her father’s sudden death in April of 1963.

Looking for more reading recommendations?  Call us at 725-5242 or email the reference desk at refdesk@curtislibrary.com.  We are happy to help!